Lost, Delayed and Damaged Luggage – Tips You Need to Know Before You Fly...

You have either seen it or heard about this gut wrenching experience. Your airplane arrives at your final destination – you walk down to baggage claim – and stand at the baggage carousel for what seems like eternity. You watch everyone else’s bags come down the conveyor belt. Then the carousel comes to an abrupt stop. You stand there staring at the empty baggage carousel when your head starts filling with panic about what happened to your luggage. Then the most important thought enters your mind – what should I do next and who’s responsible? Interesting statistics about luggage problems with the airlines, last year air travel increased about 5% among air travelers but complaints about baggage doubled. Roughly the airline industry mishandled about 6 out of every 1000 bags.  That’s not too bad, unless the bag that is lost belongs to you.  The airlines have a higher stake now more than ever to ensure your luggage gets to you. The amount the airline has to pay you for your lost luggage has increased over the years, which has resulted in airlines struggling to find a better way to move and track luggage, but they still have to deal the majority of the time with an outdated system. The manner in which airlines move and track luggage has stayed the same for the last ten years or so.  Except for a few airports that have placed electronic scanners throughout the baggage process, most airlines have no way to tell where your luggage is. What is on the horizon for the tracking of luggage is a new sophisticated system that tags bags with a radio transmitter that would allow the tracking of bags just like FedEx tracks a package.  United Airlines has taken the first step in deploying more than 600 hand held scanners to track luggage. But until this technology is wide spread or other improvements are made in the luggage system, travelers must understand the process in which...

How to Sleep on a Plane

Sleeping on board an aircraft is tough but following the advice of seasoned travelers on how to sleep on a plane is a good start to getting the rest you crave. Selecting the right seat  can make a difference, some seats are better than other if you want to sleep.  Read on to learn how to avoid noisy passengers and other annoyances of a red-eye flight. These are the top  hints we found to ensure you get rest while en route. 1. While booking your flight. Pick a nonstop and if you must have a connection try to break it up into a long and short leg rather than two legs of the same length. You’ll have more time for uninterrupted sleep on the longer leg. 2. Selecting your seat. Choose a window seat for less interruption from seat-mates who need to pass in front of you as they make their way to the aisle.  If you sleep on your right side choose a seat on the right side of the plane. That way when you turn you’ll be facing the window not the traveler in the seat next to you.  Same idea if you sleep on your left side, select a seat on the left side of the plane to maximize privacy. Back sleepers, either side of the aircraft is fine.  For all try to select a seat not directly across from the galley or near the lavatories for maximum quiet. 3.  Dress for the occasion. Wear loose clothing for comfort.  If you have to arrive wearing business attire, pack it in your carry-on and change just prior to arrival, you’ll look freshener. 4.  Use eye shades in conjunction with a pillow style you like.  There are several styles of travel pillow, so you’re sure to find one that’ll give you the support and comfort you need for sleeping  in an airplane seat. Shades block out cabin light and  give you a bit of privacy.  The Travel Halo is...

Can You Fly If Your Driver’s License or ID Card Were Lost or Stolen...

Contrary to popular belief, passengers 18 years of age or older are not automatically denied boarding if they cannot provide proper identification – they may still fly on domestic flights in the US, provided that they go through additional identity and security screening at the security checkpoint. This policy is specifically noted on the TSA’s website, at the page linked below. So the answer is yes, you can fly without a driver’s license or ID if they were lost or stolen, but read on to fully understand what is required. The reason why this policy exists is because IDs are lost or stolen and it is hardly a productive outcome for either the TSA or you if  you if they tell you can’t fly without an ID. particularly if you  lost or had your purse or wallet stolen while on vacation and have no way of getting an replacement until you are home. If you must fly without ID you should do the following 1. Plan on getting to the airport significantly earlier than you would normally, because the additional screening will take longer. 2. If checking luggage you must do so inside the airport at the check-in counter, a skycap won’t be able to help you curbside.  Airports now mandate that all passengers over the age of 18 present a government-issued form of photo identification at check-in Acceptable forms of ID are: military ID, driver’s license, or a passport at time of check-in. It’s best to call your airline and speak to a customer-service representative about its specific policies. Keep in mind that some carriers may be more lenient than others for domestic travel (however, international travel may necessitate additional forms of identification and immigration documents, such as a passport). Some airlines including Southwest Airlines and United, insist that all passengers must present a government- or state-issued photo ID at check-in–no ifs, ands, or buts. But other carriers are a bit more flexible. If you’re 17 or younger, no problem… you...

On-Board Theft – 10 Tips to Protect Valuables While You Snooze in the Sky...

Don’t Think Your Valuables In Your Carry-On Bag Are Safe In The Air With all the other worries associated with air travel  the last thing you want to think about is on-board theft. It’s where valuables are stolen from your carry-on bag while inside the air cabin. The people who steal from travelers’ carry-on bags have been both airline employees (usually flight attendants) or fellow travelers. In July of 2010, an Air France flight attendant was arrested for stealing cash and other valuables from sleeping business class passengers on long haul flights between France and Asia.  Police were alerted to the possibility of an airline flight attendant stealing from business and first class passengers in January after five passengers on a flight to Tokyo lost the equivalent of  $US 10,000 in foreign currency. Upon her arrest, police say she confessed to 26 separate thefts, but believe she committed dozens more. They also found she had a bank safe-deposit box full of stolen jewelry, credit cards, cash, blank checks, and travelers’ checks at her home. The theft of property from travelers while inside the cabin in not a huge problem, however you should be aware of it.  Minimize your chance of loss by following the tips below. 1. Hang it up carefully If you are in the habit of hanging your jacket or coat in the closet, take all your valuables — especially your wallet — out of the pockets. That’s the first place a thief will look. Both flight attendants and passengers can access the closet. 2. Mark your bags More and more bags look alike these days, so put something on your luggage that makes it stand out from the rest: a sticker or ribbon – anything that makes a mix-up less likely. This will prevent the intentional — and unintentional — handling and opening of your property. 3. Place carry-on bags upside down When you place your carry-on bag in the overhead compartment, turn it upside down,...

9 Tips for In Flight Comfort

These are 9 simple reminders about what you can actually do to be more comfortable during your time on board. Sit in bulkhead or exit row aisles. Bulkheads offer extra leg room and no one can recline his seat back into your face. Remember that you have to store your carry-on luggage in the overheads though. Exit rows have the luxury of extra foot room, but you must be able to open the emergency door, if needed. Dress for duress.  Wear flat-soled, lace-up shoes so you can loosen them if your feet swell. Rubber soles might catch on the exit slide during an emergency, and dress shoes don’t adjust for swelling. Entertain yourself. Bring plenty of magazines; they’re lighter than books and disposable. Don’t forget your iPod, either; it’s the perfect way to catch up on those podcasts you’ve been meaning to listen to or to avoid unwelcome chatter from the person sitting next to you Do “air-aerobics“. A number of airlines offer in-seat exercise routines to help reduce swelling and pain from cramped muscles and reduced circulation. A number of airlines offer in-flight tips. Fix your posture.  Airline seats don’t adjust for relaxed spinal posture. Support your lumbar spine with a rolled-up blanket and your head and neck with a pillow. Another pillow or blanket to prop up your feet will relieve pressure on the backs of your thighs. Sit up front. A recently released Harvard study found air quality in aircraft cabins didn’t meet minimum standards for office buildings. You’ll find less carbon dioxide in forward seats. During layovers, get off and take a walk; breathe deeply. Drink eight ounces of water every hour. Airplane air has only 1% to 10% humidity, even less than most deserts. You’ll need more than the two small cart drinks offered on most flights. Bring your own bottle, and ask for a fill up on the first round of drinks; avoid coffee, alcohol and carbonated drinks, which are dehydrating diuretics. Eat...

In Flight Entertainment and Movie Listings

Want to know what movie is showing on your next trip? Here’s the place.  As you look forward to on board entertainment don’t forget to give a thought to your personal comfort while en route. Airlines are a bit more frugal these days will all on board amenities. Savvy travelers now bring their own must-have items to insure their time on board is restful and relaxing so they arrive refreshed and ready. Flyer favorites include:  Inflatable pillows, they take up very little room in your carry-on in comparison with the bulky filled horse shoe neck pillows. Plus, ever stop to think about how clean and bug-free really are airline pillow? These pillows have soft coverings and are easy to clean. Arrive refreshed by shaking off the that Jet Lag. The most trusted and proven anti-jet lag product is homeopathic, it’s not a drug. Learn more about No Jet Lag, here. The last thing we think every traveler should have is a good eye mask and ear-plugs to keep out the sights and noise of the flight. Enjoy restful sleep anytime, anywhere with a Sweet Dreams Sleep and Relaxation Mask with Earplugs and Pouch. This is no ordinary sleep mask! Light as a feather, the Sweet Dreams Sleep and Relaxation Mask is a molded contoured sleep aid that is uniquely designed to block out light while offering full comfort without any pressure to the eyes or smearing makeup. In Flight Entertainment and Movies Air Canada Air India Air New Zealand American West American Airlines British Airways Delta Airlines JetBlue Korean Air Lan Chile Hawaiian Air Malaysian Airlines South African Airways Thai Airways United Airlines US Airways Virgin Atlantic To see more flight comfort gear,...