2 Must-Dos When Booking Hotel Rooms

After you pick the location for your next hotel stay, savvy travelers recommend you do two thing to ensure a more relaxing stay. First you need to give security some thought, even if you’re staying at a top resort. Next you should make your personal requests known in advance. Security Priorities   Request a hotel room in the “safest room zone”. That’s defined as a room on the second floor or higher,  but below the 6th in case there is a fire and the fire department needs to reach you.  A room on the ground floor that has doors or windows that open to the outside is riskier especially in the case of motels, rooms off parking lots, or if you like to sleep with an open window. Who else can access your room? Pack a portable travel door lock. You never know if there are extra keys, key cards or pass keys out there that can open your hotel room while you are inside.  You’ll sleep more soundly know your room is truly locked. ( photo with click through link) Identity theft happens most frequently in hotels. According to Experian , identity theft crimes take place most commonly in hotels (24 percent), restaurants (18 percent)  and followed by airports (12 percent). Guard your credit cards, ID and passport when  you are traveling. Do not give out your credit card number to someone calling your room, even if they say they are calling from the front desk. Do not use the open WiFi connection or business center computers to conduct personal business or anything requiring a password protecting personal data. How safe is the room safe? A common place you leave items with your personal information while you are away from the room is the room safe. All hotel safes have a bypass code or way to open them in case a guest forgets their pass-code or if the safe’s electronics fail. Theft from a room safe is virtually un-provable....

How to Sleep on a Plane

Sleeping on board an aircraft is tough but following the advice of seasoned travelers on how to sleep on a plane is a good start to getting the rest you crave. Selecting the right seat  can make a difference, some seats are better than other if you want to sleep.  Read on to learn how to avoid noisy passengers and other annoyances of a red-eye flight. These are the top  hints we found to ensure you get rest while en route. 1. While booking your flight. Pick a nonstop and if you must have a connection try to break it up into a long and short leg rather than two legs of the same length. You’ll have more time for uninterrupted sleep on the longer leg. 2. Selecting your seat. Choose a window seat for less interruption from seat-mates who need to pass in front of you as they make their way to the aisle.  If you sleep on your right side choose a seat on the right side of the plane. That way when you turn you’ll be facing the window not the traveler in the seat next to you.  Same idea if you sleep on your left side, select a seat on the left side of the plane to maximize privacy. Back sleepers, either side of the aircraft is fine.  For all try to select a seat not directly across from the galley or near the lavatories for maximum quiet. 3.  Dress for the occasion. Wear loose clothing for comfort.  If you have to arrive wearing business attire, pack it in your carry-on and change just prior to arrival, you’ll look freshener. 4.  Use eye shades in conjunction with a pillow style you like.  There are several styles of travel pillow, so you’re sure to find one that’ll give you the support and comfort you need for sleeping  in an airplane seat. Shades block out cabin light and  give you a bit of privacy.  The Travel Halo is...

9 Tips for In Flight Comfort

These are 9 simple reminders about what you can actually do to be more comfortable during your time on board. Sit in bulkhead or exit row aisles. Bulkheads offer extra leg room and no one can recline his seat back into your face. Remember that you have to store your carry-on luggage in the overheads though. Exit rows have the luxury of extra foot room, but you must be able to open the emergency door, if needed. Dress for duress.  Wear flat-soled, lace-up shoes so you can loosen them if your feet swell. Rubber soles might catch on the exit slide during an emergency, and dress shoes don’t adjust for swelling. Entertain yourself. Bring plenty of magazines; they’re lighter than books and disposable. Don’t forget your iPod, either; it’s the perfect way to catch up on those podcasts you’ve been meaning to listen to or to avoid unwelcome chatter from the person sitting next to you Do “air-aerobics“. A number of airlines offer in-seat exercise routines to help reduce swelling and pain from cramped muscles and reduced circulation. A number of airlines offer in-flight tips. Fix your posture.  Airline seats don’t adjust for relaxed spinal posture. Support your lumbar spine with a rolled-up blanket and your head and neck with a pillow. Another pillow or blanket to prop up your feet will relieve pressure on the backs of your thighs. Sit up front. A recently released Harvard study found air quality in aircraft cabins didn’t meet minimum standards for office buildings. You’ll find less carbon dioxide in forward seats. During layovers, get off and take a walk; breathe deeply. Drink eight ounces of water every hour. Airplane air has only 1% to 10% humidity, even less than most deserts. You’ll need more than the two small cart drinks offered on most flights. Bring your own bottle, and ask for a fill up on the first round of drinks; avoid coffee, alcohol and carbonated drinks, which are dehydrating diuretics. Eat...

How to Create an Emergency File for Travel

Emergency Files Emergencies happen, and usually at a moment when you or your family least expect it. Imagine if something were to happen to you or your home which would prevent you from accessing your home, your office, your bank, your cell phone. Your normal life would come to an abrupt “stop”! Hard to imagine? It happens all the time, be it due to an unexpected death, or a natural emergency such as an earthquake, fire, hurricane, tornado, flood, or storm. Travel can pose another scenario where you should have a contingency plan to access personal and financial information. While there are many sources of information that focus on physical preparedness, many do not include what is commonly called a “Red File”. The Red File is designed to include copies of or locations where everything that is necessary for you or your family to rebuild your financial and operational life in the aftermath of an event. Keep in mind that many potential emergencies may require you to evacuate your home. Some may be short, others longer and still others may prevent you from returning at all. Despite your displacement, many facets of normal life continue. Bills need to be paid, purchases need to be made, bank accounts need to be accessed and memories and important records need to be preserved. If forced to evacuate your home quickly, you won’t have time to gather all of your important files, pictures, and other items. If disaster strikes when you are awe from home a digital red file could be a “life saver”. Have a Digital File Everyone should complete a “Red File” and make sure that those important to you and your life know where it is.  Having a digital “Red File” is a must if you need to access it while away from home, like when traveling. Many prefer to keep original or copies of documents in a safe and secure place such as a bolted down fire safe, or even more safer, inside a...

Honeymoon Identity Crisis – Read Before You Travel on Your Honeymoon!...

Problem – The Name on Your ID Doesn’t Match the Name on Your Ticket This is a common honeymooner pitfall that has affected plenty of newly married couples who travel right after they get married. Newlywed couples arriving at the airport to take their honeymoon trip face an identification crisis at airport check-in – the bride is booked on the airline and trip tickets in her married name, but has not legally changed it yet.  Understand that if you get a grumpy TSA or ticket agent, you won’t be able to travel. This can even be a problem if your passport is valid and your visa is in hand. While getting married is obviously exciting – and many women can’t wait to use their new name, don’t book travel in your married name until all of your legal documents have been properly changed and you have the new documents and identification cards in your hand. Solution – Book and Fly in Your Pre-Married Name Women are not able to change their name legally until after they have received their marriage license! Licenses are typically valid for  30 -90 days. With so much going on before a wedding the last thing you want to do is follow-up on the receipt of new ID’s.  Additionally, if you book your travel way in advance to get the best airfares you may not have your marriage license at the time of booking if it has a short expiration.  Layer into this the passport renewal lead time if you need a new one. Our suggestion, is to book your trip to match all your current,  ID such as passport, drivers license etc. Again, book your travel in your non-married name so it matches all you pre-wedding ID. But what if you’ve already made the honest mistake?  If it’s too late and you already showed up to the airport, flash a smile and your shiny rings, ask for a manager, and show identification that shows your maiden...

Best and Fastest Way to Access Important Documents in an Emergency...

When planning your trip, especially overseas, you need to plan what you would do if you lost or had your important travel documents stolen.  While this might be an inconvenience domestically, once you are in another country it grows into a time-consuming and frustrating problem.  Have peace of mind knowing your contingency plan is in place.  How would you replace documents overseas – knowing that: Replacing your important documents will take longer to replace overseas Documents are harder to replace overseas Know that depending on what documents your have stolen or are lost can very possibly impact your ability to travel or fly to your next destination – or even home.  This can cost you more money because you will probably have to pay for extra hotel days and change of flight fees. Storing travel documents so you can have easy access to them in an emergency is not difficult, but you must have a method before you leave.Here are a few tips to help. Step 1 Make copies of all important travel documents before you leave on your trip. Copies should include the following documents: Passport, including the identification page and pages within of prior countries visited Visas; Driver’s license; Birth certificate; Work permit; Credit cards; Travelers checks; Airline itinerary; Hotel or lodging reservation confirmations Car rental reservation confirmation Cruise tickets Any other pre-paid confirmations Travel insurance; Health insurance Vaccination certificates (Some countries require a vaccination certificate for specific infectious diseases. For example, travelers entering Venezuela from certain countries are required to show a current yellow fever vaccination certificate.) Any other important documents. When making copies of credit cards, do not make copies of the CV code on the back of the card – or better yet, just obliterate that number.  Know that the back of most credit cards have the banks phone numbers to call to contact the card issuer in case of an emergency. When possible, make copies of these documents in both color and black...