What to Pack for Europe to Minimize Looking Like a Tourist

BY Travel Writer

Leave These Fashions for Home, Not Europe

Leave clothes that scream tourist at home because they call attention to you, which can be unflattering and even dangerous in Europe. Tourists are typically the target of pickpockets, thieves and scam artists, so why broadcast that you could be a potential victim. It’s better to blend in more with the locals, even if you still look like a tourist at least look like a smart and savvy one and one that is respectful of the norms of your destination. While you may be thinking comfort while packing steer clear items such as pajama bottoms, T-shirts with big logos, message T’s, team logos, baseball caps and white socks with tennis shoes. A fashion trend here at home is wearing athletic or work-out gear all day even if you’re not working out. That’s a fashion don’t in Europe and shouts, I’m an American tourist! Another detriment of looking too touristy is that locals may provide inferior service or be less friendly.

What Should You Pack for Europe?

Pack clothes that all mix and match so you can layer. Here are some on what to pack for Europe.

    1. Women, choose 3/4 length pants or jersey knit clothes that are designed to go together. Select pants, a skirt, and top in this same easy care fabric. They pack small, are wrinkle resistant and look great with a scarf, and either a casual or more tailored jacket. Pick a solid color or two that complement each other. These are comfortable, easy care, and pack wrinkle free.

2.  A light-weight denim or cotton shirt that you can wear by its self or open over a T-shirt or tank or extra warmth.

3. Next, pack a scarf that you wear over bare shoulders in a church, or to jazz up your outfit. Around your neck it pulls an outfit together, and open around your shoulders it offers a little warmth. Some scarves like this infinity scarf have a hidden zippered pocket secure valuables. Select a couple of patterns to change out your look.4. Pack comfortable walking shoes. Brands like Cole-Hann, Merell, and Clarks are excellent choices. And speaking of footwear, soft durable socks are a must! No-show socks are currently popular. Leave the flip flops for pool or resort destinations.

5. Pack a light-weight rain jacket with a hood. This way you don’t need an umbrella.6. Take a small anti-theft crossbody handbag you can use during the day or night, and pack a small anti-theft daypack. It should be able to hold your rain jacket, a water bottle, a tube of sunscreen, have room for a sandwich, and if you carry a camera that too. Select an antitheft daypack that has locking zippers to keep your valuables secure and pickpockets out. This item can double as your personal carry-on item on the plane.7. Use the lightest weight piece of luggage that you can. In many older charming hotels, you’ll have to carry your bag up a couple of flights to your room. Elevators, if you’re lucky enough to have one, in older properties, are typically small and maneuvering a heavy bag in and out of them is difficult.

Accessories for Europe

  1. A plug adaptor, learn what you’ll need (converter vs adaptor). It’s less than what you used to pack. Most laptops, phones, and electronics have built-in voltage converters that protect the device. If you’re not sure contact the manufacturer to confirm, it’s worth the extra effort.

2.  Appliances such as curling irons and blow dryers could be more difficult, the best alternative is to pack a dual voltage device. Even with a dual voltage device, you may experience a problem due to older wiring, etc. Our advice is to email your hotel in advance to see if they have a hair dryer and use that one.

3.  Secure your passport and other small with a hidden money belt. As an alternative check out pickpocket proof clothing that has hidden pockets for valuables.

4. Take laundry soap sheets or travel laundry detergent packets and wash your clothes during your trip. If they don’t dry overnight, use the hair dryer to finish the job. 

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